U.S. Constitution - Article 1 Section 8 - The U.S. Constitution Online - zellebrss.tk

 

article section 8

Article I, Section 8 of the U.S. Constitution specifies the “expressed” or “enumerated” powers of zellebrss.tk specific powers form the basis of the American system of “federalism,” the division and sharing of powers between the central government and the state governments. Article 1 Section 8 of the United States Constitution. Article 1 - The Legislative Branch Section 8 - Powers of Congress >. The Congress shall have Power To lay and collect Taxes, Duties, Imposts and Excises, to pay the Debts and provide for the common Defence and general Welfare of the United States; but all Duties, Imposts and Excises shall be uniform. PREAMBLE: We the People of the United States, in Order to form a more perfect Union, establish Justice, insure domestic Tranquility, provide for the common defence, promote the general Welfare, and secure the Blessings of Liberty to ourselves and our Posterity, do ordain and establish this Constitution But this section, Article One.


Article I | U.S. Constitution | US Law | LII / Legal Information Institute


Article I, Section 8 of the U, article section 8. Perhaps the most important powers reserved to Congress by Article I, Section 8 are those to create taxes, tariffs and other sources of funds needed to maintain the operations and programs of the federal government and to authorize the expenditure of those funds.

In addition to the taxation powers in Article I, the Sixteenth Amendment authorizes Congress to establish and provide for the collection of a national income tax. The complete text of Article I, Section 8 creating the 17 enumerated powers of Congress reads as follows:. Over the years, Congress has relied on the Commerce Clause to pass environmental, gun control, and consumer protection laws because many aspects of business require materials and products to cross state lines.

However, the scope of the laws passed under the Commerce Clause is not unlimited, article section 8. Concerned about the rights of the states, the U. Supreme Court in recent years has article section 8 rulings limiting the power of Congress to pass legislation under the commerce clause or other powers specifically contained in Article I, Section 8. For example, the Supreme Court has overturned the federal Gun-Free School Zones Act of and laws intended to protect abused women on the grounds that article section 8 localized police matters should be regulated by the states, article section 8.

All powers not granted to the U. Congress by Article I, Section 8 are left to the states. Worried that these limitations to the powers of the federal government were not clearly enough stated in the original Constitution, the First Congress adopted the Tenth Article section 8which clearly states that all powers not granted to the federal government are reserved to the states or the people. Share Flipboard Email. Issues The U. Government U. Legal System U.

Foreign Policy U. Liberal Politics U. Robert Longley is a U. He has written for ThoughtCo since Updated January 03, Constitution grants the U.

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Article I, Section Eight: The Powers of Congress

 

article section 8

 

Article I, Section 8 of the U.S. Constitution specifies the “expressed” or “enumerated” powers of zellebrss.tk specific powers form the basis of the American system of “federalism,” the division and sharing of powers between the central government and the state governments. Article 1 Section 8 of the United States Constitution. Article 1 - The Legislative Branch Section 8 - Powers of Congress >. The Congress shall have Power To lay and collect Taxes, Duties, Imposts and Excises, to pay the Debts and provide for the common Defence and general Welfare of the United States; but all Duties, Imposts and Excises shall be uniform. PREAMBLE: We the People of the United States, in Order to form a more perfect Union, establish Justice, insure domestic Tranquility, provide for the common defence, promote the general Welfare, and secure the Blessings of Liberty to ourselves and our Posterity, do ordain and establish this Constitution But this section, Article One.