Persuasive Essays and The Classical Argument: Classical Argument Outline Example

 

classical argument outline

Classical Argument Structure: I. Introduction to general topic which leads to a clear thesis II. A moment of definition, background, and/or precedence (this is a section which clarifies and gives history on the topic or your stance on it). III. Support 1: This is typically the most logical reason why one should support your claim. a. Evidence b. Aug 24,  · Please tag or label this post as "classical argument outline". This is the outline for your 1st draft of your persuasive essay. This is in the classical argument format. If you need more information on the classical argument, check out the sample classical argument or the classical argument PDF. 1. The Classical Argument. Adapted from Walter Beale, Real Writing, 2 nd edition, One of the oldest organizing devices in rhetoric is the classical argument, which incorporates the five parts of a discourse that ancient teachers of rhetoric believed were necessary for persuasion, especially when the audience included a mixture of reactions from favorable to hostile.


Classical Argument


Adapted from Walter Beale, Real Writing2 nd edition, One of the oldest organizing devices in rhetoric is the classical argument outline argumentwhich incorporates classical argument outline five parts of a discourse that ancient teachers of rhetoric believed were necessary for persuasion, especially when the audience included a mixture of reactions from favorable to hostile.

They often prescribed this order to students, not because it was absolutely ideal, but because using the scheme encouraged the writer to take account of some of the most important elements of composing:. But if you use the structure as a way to make sure you cover all the needs of all parts of your audience, you will find it a very useful heuristic for developing effective arguments. The classical argument classical argument outline consists of five parts:.

In Writing, classical argument outline. In writing, the first two parts of the classical argument, the introduction and narrationclassical argument outline, are often run together. Since the writer needs to focus on grabbing and focusing attention rather than making the audience feel comfortable before beginning the argument, a written classical argument usually condenses these two elements into one.

The confirmationwhere you present the claims and evidence that back up or substantiate the classical argument outline of your argument. These claims and evidence are often connected together in a chain of reasoning that link the reasoningfacts and examples, and testimony i. The concession and refutation sections, which go together, exist because arguments always have more than one side, classical argument outline.

It is always dangerous to ignore them. Moreover, reasonable audiences often have more than one response to an argument. So considering the opposing viewpoints enables a good arguer to anticipate and respond to the objections that her or his position might raise, and defuse opposition before it gets started.

The introduction has four jobs to do:. What is the situation that this argument responds to? What elements of background or context need to be presented for this audience? Is this new information or am I just reminding them of matters they already have some familiarity with? What are the principal issues involved in this argument?

Classical argument outline do I stand on this issue? What tone should I establish? What image of myself should I project? But a rational audience has strong expectations of the kinds of proof you will and will not provide to help it accept your point of view, classical argument outline.

Most of the arguments used classical argument outline the confirmation tend to be of the inartistic kind, but artistic proofs can also be used to support this section.

Again, here is a place to use both pathos and ethos : by conceding those matters of feeling and values that you can agree on, while stressing the character issues, you can create the opportunity for listening and understanding.

But you will also have to refute that is, counter or out-argue the points your opposition will make. You can do this in four ways:, classical argument outline.

In general, strategies 2 and 3 are easier to pull off than strategy 1. However, if you try to step back in your conclusion, classical argument outline, you can often find a way to give a satisfying sense of closure. You might hark back to the background: why has this remained a problem and why is it so important to solve it, your way, now?

Or you might hark back to the common ground you have with your audience: why does accepting your argument reinforce your shared beliefs and values? And this sense of incompleteness leaves readers dissatisfied and sometimes less likely to accept your argument. So spending a little extra time to round the conclusion out is almost always worthwhile in making the argument more successful, classical argument outline. They often prescribed this order to students, not because it was absolutely ideal, but because using the scheme encouraged the writer to take account of some of the most important elements of composing: beginning in an interesting way providing background or context that was relevant to their specific audience stating their claims and evidence clearly and emphatically taking account of opposing viewpoints and anticipating objections and concluding in a satisfying and effective way.

The classical argument traditionally consists of five parts: In Writing In writing, the first two parts of the classical argument, the introduction and narrationare often run together.

 

Essay Tips: What is a Classical Argument Essay?

 

classical argument outline

 

The Classical Argument. Adapted from Walter Beale, Real Writing, 2 nd edition, One of the oldest organizing devices in rhetoric is the classical argument, which incorporates the five parts of a discourse that ancient teachers of rhetoric believed were necessary for persuasion, especially when the audience included a mixture of reactions from favorable to hostile. The Classical Argument Since rhetors began teaching Greek farmers strategies for appealing their cases to Greek courts in the fifth century B.C., the classical argument has stood as a model for writers who believe their case can be argued plausibly and logically to an open-minded audience. This format is . Classic Model for an Argument No one structure fits all written arguments. However, most college courses require arguments that consist of the following elements. Below is a basic outline for an argumentative or persuasive essay. This is only one possible outline or organization. Always refer to your handbook for specifics. I. Introductory.